Good words on bad omics words: "A crisis in postgenomic nomenclature" from 2002

Just got pointed to a fun paper from 2002 “A Crisis in Postgenomic Nomenclature by Stanley Fields and Mark Johnston” by Mark Johnston himself. Their paper, in Science, is available for free on Stanley Fields website here. It is actually a hilarious tongue in cheek read where they proceed from arguing for more specificity in omics names (e.g., they go so far as to propose a EC# like system with things such as the “4.7.5.3.8ome” and also that conditions should be specified like the “37°-7.4-G1-Golgi-N-but-not- 63 O-linked glycosylome”.  And they end with a proposal to replace the term “the cell” with either the someone or the omesome.  It is definitely worth a read.

Author: Jonathan Eisen

I am an evolutionary biologist and a Professor at U. C. Davis. (see my lab site here). My research focuses on the origin of novelty (how new processes and functions originate). To study this I focus on sequencing and analyzing genomes of organisms, especially microbes and using phylogenomic analysis

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