Phyloseminar: David Pollock 5/30 10am PST “Adaptation, coevolution, & convergence in the context of protein thermodynamics”

Next talk at http://phyloseminar.org/

"Adaptation, coevolution, and convergence in the context of protein thermodynamics"

David Pollock (University of Colorado School of Medicine)

Interactions within and between proteins are a fundamentally important part of how they evolve and adapt. We have been considering how and why proteins adapt, coevolve, and converge, and working to understand these concepts in the context of protein thermostability and function.

We will expand from the previous talk of our collaborator, Dr.
Goldstein, and discuss how and why coevolution is and should be detected, and how thermostability affects reconstruction of ancestral functions. Further, we will discuss our work on adaptive redesign in mitochondrial proteins, perhaps the largest known case of an adaptive burst in multiple metabolic proteins. The convergence between ancestral snakes and ancestral acrodont lizards is also perhaps the largest known case of adaptive convergence. We will consider what these examples tell us about the theory of how proteins appear to evolve in the context of nearly neutral versus cases of adaptive change. Further, we will discuss the impact on understanding phylogenetic relationships, and we will also discuss a unified theory of nearly neutral and adaptive evolution in the context of structure and function.

West Coast USA: 10:00 (10:00 AM) on Wednesday, May 30
East Coast USA: 13:00 (01:00 PM) on Wednesday, May 30
UK: 18:00 (06:00 PM) on Wednesday, May 30
France: 19:00 (07:00 PM) on Wednesday, May 30
Japan: 02:00 (02:00 AM) on Thursday, May 31
New Zealand: 05:00 (05:00 AM) on Thursday, May 31

Author: Jonathan Eisen

I am an evolutionary biologist and a Professor at U. C. Davis. (see my lab site here). My research focuses on the origin of novelty (how new processes and functions originate). To study this I focus on sequencing and analyzing genomes of organisms, especially microbes and using phylogenomic analysis

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