Phyloseminar June 27: Carl Woese’s grand view of life that just keeps getting grander” by Phil Hugenholtz June 27

Next phyloseminar (see http://phyloseminar.org for more information)

Next talk: Carl Woese’s grand view of life that just keeps getting grander"

Phil Hugenholtz (University of Queensland)

Most microorganisms cannot be grown in pure culture (or at least not
easily). This has been apparent for decades by comparing the number of
cells seen under a microscope to the fraction of those cells that will
grow into colony forming units (typically <1%). The objective
classification of cellular life by comparative rRNA analysis pioneered
by Carl Woese provided the first grand view of the tree of life and
also provided the reference framework upon which his friend and
colleague, Norman Pace, developed ways to directly survey microbial
communities via their rRNA sequences without the need to grow them.
This put our degree of ignorance of the microbial world into
perspective: dozens of major microbial lineages have emerged over the
last 20 years that lack even a single cultured representative. New
approaches, such as deep metagenomics and single cell genomics, are
now transforming the rRNA-based phylogenetic outlines of the tree of
life into a fully-fledged genome-based view of the tree. I will
present a recent snapshot overview of the genome tree of the bacterial
and archaeal domains and examples of functional insights in the
context of a more complete view of microbial evolution.

West Coast USA: 16:00 (04:00 PM) on Thursday, June 27
East Coast USA: 19:00 (07:00 PM) on Thursday, June 27
UK: 00:00 (12:00 AM) on Friday, June 28
France: 01:00 (01:00 AM) on Friday, June 28
Japan: 08:00 (08:00 AM) on Friday, June 28
New Zealand: 11:00 (11:00 AM) on Friday, June 28

Author: Jonathan Eisen

I am an evolutionary biologist and a Professor at U. C. Davis. (see my lab site here). My research focuses on the origin of novelty (how new processes and functions originate). To study this I focus on sequencing and analyzing genomes of organisms, especially microbes and using phylogenomic analysis

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s