At @ucdavis today: Judith Butler – Scholars at Risk: What Are the Obligations of Universities?

Of possible interest from an email:

This is a reminder that TODAY, Judith Butler, the Maxine Elliott Professor of Comparative Literature at UC Berkeley, will be giving a lecture as part of The UC Davis Forums series. She will be speaking on the topic of "Scholars at Risk: What Are the Obligations of Universities?"

The lecture will take place in Ballroom B of the Activities and Recreation Center (ARC) from 3 to 4:30 p.m., with a reception and light refreshments to follow. This event is free and open to the public.

Please see the flyer below for more information, and feel free to contact us with any questions.

See you all soon for what will be another insightful Forum!

The UC Davis Forums
forums.ucdavis.edu

Judith Butler Flyer.pdf

New preprint from Eisen Lab: Genomes from Bacteria Associated with the Canine Oral Cavity: a Test Case for Automated Genome-Based Taxonomic Assignment 

Quick post here.  New preprint out: Genomes from Bacteria Associated with the Canine Oral Cavity: a Test Case for Automated Genome-Based Taxonomic Assignment | bioRxiv

Authors: David A. Coil, Guillaume Jospin, Aaron E. Darling, Corrin Wallis, Ian J. Davis, Stephen Harris, Jonathan A. Eisen, Lucy J. Holcombe, Ciaran O’Flynn

At @ucdavis 2/21: Mary E. Power “Floods, Drought, and River Food Webs”

STORER LECTURESHIP IN LIFE SCIENCES

Mary E. Power

Department of Integrative Biology University of California Berkeley

Dr. Power is an ecologist and a professor in the Department of Integrative Biology at UC Berkeley. Her research focuses primarily on food web, landscape and community ecology,. She often performs her research close to home in the Eel River of California. Her research seeks to provide insights that will help forecast how river-structured ecosystems will respond to watershed and regional scale changes in climate, land use, or biota. Since 1988, she has been the director of the Angelo Coast Range Reserve, an 8000-arce natural reserve protected for university teaching, research, and outreach.

Dr. Power has been elected to the National Academy of Sciences, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and the California Academy of Sciences. She received the Kempe Award for Distinguished Ecologists and was awarded the G. Evelyn Hutchison Medal from the American Society of Limnology and Oceanography.

Scientific Lecture: Floods, Drought, and River Food Webs

February 21, 2019, 4:10 – 5 pm, 176 Everson Hall

We look forward to seeing you!

Please share and distribute widely.

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Power_flyer_v3.pdf

At UC Davis 6/4: Stephen (Fringy) Richards “Genomic Innovation within the Phylum Arthropoda”

Stephen (Fringy) Richards will be giving a talk at UC Davis on June 4

“Genomic Innovation within the Phylum Arthropoda” June 4th at 4:00 PM in GBSF 4202 (see attached flyer).

Fringy is currently an Associate Professor at the Baylor College of Medicine, Human Genome Sequencing Center.

2018-Fringy Announcement.pdf

UCB IB Dept Lecturer Pool for “General Biology”

Lecturer Positions in General Biology – BIO 1B

Department of Integrative Biology

University of California, Berkeley

The Department of Integrative Biology at UC Berkeley is generating an applicant pool of qualified temporary full or part-time lecturers to teach the General Biology laboratory class, BIO 1B (http://ib.berkeley.edu/courses/bio1b/), should the need arise. The pool will remain in place for one calendar year; those interested in remaining in the pool after the year must reapply. Appointments may be renewable based on need, funding, and performance. Positions range from 50% – 100%, depending on the number of sections taught. Vacancies may arise during Fall, Spring, or Summer.

The laboratory class currently covers three major sections: Evolution, Ecology, and Organismal Diversity. Exercises include investigations into population genetics, phylogenetic relationships, macroevolution, predator/prey interactions, competition, bioindicators, and structure and function of organisms. BIO 1B is a gateway course to the major field of Integrative Biology that consists of three one-hour lectures and one four-hour combined discussion and lab each week. The class has 48 sections with a maximum of 18 students in each section. Lecturers will be required to lead one discussion and lab per week, create quizzes, grade assignments, attend a Friday instructional meeting, be familiar with lecture, proctor exams, hold office hours and complete other instructional duties as assigned. Senior lecturers mentor new hires and Graduate Student Instructors (GSIs).

Minimum Basic Qualifications (by time of application): The completion of all Ph.D. degree requirements except the dissertation is required at the time of application.

Additional Qualifications (by start date): A Ph.D. or equivalent degree in biology or a closely related discipline is required by the time of appointment. Experience teaching a college-level course (previously employed as a graduate student instructor, teaching assistant, lecturer, etc.) of the biological sciences is also required.

Preferred Qualifications: Experience working with computer-based phylogenetic programs and familiarity with online course and grading systems is preferred. Preference will be given to those with experience teaching a class similar to UC Berkeley’s Bio 1B lab courses.

Minimum full-time annual salary is $53,402. Salary is commensurate with experience and education.

Appointments for fall semesters are usually reviewed in May and finalists are selected once funding is confirmed for the next academic year. Spring semester appointments are reviewed in September. Reviews for Summer are in January.

Application requirements to apply: Cover letter, curriculum vitae, statement of teaching philosophy, student evaluations of teaching, and names and email addresses of three references. One miscellaneous teaching document is optional. Please include career highlights in the cover letter that specifically address the subject matter of our course. The CV should include teaching experience with a listing of dates, courses, units, and title (Lecturer, Graduate Student Instructor/Teaching Assistant, Guest Lecturer, etc.). Statement of Teaching Philosophy should be no more than three pages. Student evaluations of teaching should include all respondents (quantitative and qualitative). For those with considerable teaching experience, complete student evaluations of teaching from the last three courses taught will suffice. The cover letter, CV, and complete student teaching evaluations are very important. To receive full consideration, please ensure your application is complete by the time of review. To apply:

ib_recruit.

Letters of recommendation may be requested of finalists. If reference letters are later solicited by the Department, they will be treated as confidential per University of California policy and California state law. Please refer potential referees, including when letters are provided via a third party (i.e., dossier service or career center), to the UC Berkeley statement of confidentiality

(http://apo.berkeley.edu/evalltr.html) prior to submitting their letters.

The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer. All qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability, age, or protected veteran status. For the complete University of California nondiscrimination and affirmative action policy see:

http://policy.ucop.edu/doc/4000376/NondiscrimAffirmAct. The department is interested in candidates who will contribute to diversity and equal opportunity in higher education through their teaching.

Bio 1B Lecturer Pool Ad for 2018-2019v2.pdf

5/18 at @ucdavis: Kristen Beck on “Large scale analysis of food ingredient metatranscriptomes reveals insights about hazards and food quality”

DEB/ECH 294 SEMINAR

Large scale analysis of food ingredient metatranscriptomes reveals insights about hazards and food quality

Kristen Beck, Ph.D.

Research Staff Member, Industrial and Applied Genomics

IBM Almaden Research Center, San Jose

Friday, May 18, 2018
11:00am * 1022 Life Sciences

Abstract: As the challenges of protecting global food supply chains become more complex, the technical approaches being used to understand and guard against threats are becoming more sophisticated. Food safety testing is beginning to adopt new technologies such as next generation sequencing of DNA or RNA in their monitoring procedures and the cost of next generation sequencing is only decreasing with time. Together, this makes providing food safety solutions a very data-intensive problem. By surveilling the microbiome of food ingredients, we can develop methods and best practices that can be used to improve food testing standards and security of the food supply chain. As part of the Consortium for Sequencing the Food Supply Chain, we’ve utilized hundreds of terabytes of raw sequencing and derivative data to show that microbes will respond to perturbations in their environment and can be useful as an indicator of food safety hazards. By monitoring food microbiomes, we can better understand food safety hazards and quality issues that may arise in the supply chain.

Bio: Dr. Beck is a research staff member in the Industrial and Applied Genomics group in the Accelerated Discovery Lab of IBM Research. She has been involved in food-related research for over a decade. She has published contributions in mechanistic studies of omega-3 fatty acids in tumorigenesis as well as composition of primate breast milks among other topics. Since joining IBM Research in 2015, she has been an essential member of the Consortium for Sequencing the Food Supply Chain and now serves as the IBM Technical Lead. Her current research focuses on analyzing next generation sequencing data to gain insights about microbial ecology in food ingredients as well as confidently determining of the presence of various hazards such as pathogenic organisms, antimicrobial resistance genes, and food fraud. She received a Ph.D. in Biochemistry, Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology with a Designated Emphasis in Biotechnology from the University of California, Davis and is a proud almuna and trainee of the Biotechnology Program.

flier.pdf