Why I Tweet and Blog: Captured by Beryl Lieff Benderly

You know, many people ask me – why do I talk to science reporters so often.  They ask this and then claim that science reporters are just all kinds of evil because they always get quotes and facts and concepts wrong.  Well, that has really not been my experience.  Sure, I have my examples of problems.  But overall, I have been impressed and pleased more often than not.  And here is a great example. I was interviewed a while back by Beryl Lieff Benderly about my somewhat obsessive experimentation with social media for communicating science.  And then, of course, I forgot about it.  So I was exceptionally pleased when I saw the story come out today: To tweet or not to tweet? | Science Careers.  Beryl did a remarkably good job in capturing the essence of my thoughts about Tweeting, Blogging, social media, and science communication.

If you want to know what I think about how to not get overwhelmed with Twitter, how to not spend too much time on social media, and what I think abotu aboutb social media, you don’t need to wait for me to try to write my thoughts on the topic down.  Read what Beryl wrote.

About Jonathan Eisen

I am an evolutionary biologist and a Professor at U. C. Davis. (see my lab site here). My research focuses on the origin of novelty (how new processes and functions originate). To study this I focus on sequencing and analyzing genomes of organisms, especially microbes and using phylogenomic analysis

3 thoughts on “Why I Tweet and Blog: Captured by Beryl Lieff Benderly

  1. It continues to amaze me how many other scientists I know (or any professional for that matter) say things like “Why do you use Twitter? Isn't that for teenagers?” It's nice to see Science Careers still plugging away at the importance of Social Media nowadays. They ran a similar story last February (shameless self promotion follows!) http://sciencecareers.sciencemag.org/career_magazine/previous_issues/articles/2014_02_28/science.opms.r1400141

    Like

  2. I had a very poor result in my first serious dust-up with the media in 2006, in the pre-twitter days. I have actually been using social media to correct certain misstatements of fact and intent that were started by poor (sensationalist) science reporting back then. And even then, there were excellent reporters (Alison Motluck who wrote for CBC) in addition to poor ones that shall go unnamed…

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s