A #YAMMMY #manel brought to you by #UCSF #QB3 "Medical Devices Reimagined"

And in today’s #YAMMY #manel we have “Medical Devices Reimagined”: the Third Annual Rosenman Symposium Tickets, Wed, Jun 22, 2016 at 1:00 PM | Eventbrite

With the following very diverse array of speakers. Good times.  If you are on of the right kind.

  • Adam Gazzaley Adam Gazzaley
  • Hanson Gifford Hanson Gifford
  • Darrell Johnson Darrell Johnson
  • Bryan LarsonBryan Larson
  • Ron Leuty Ron Leuty
  • Brian Otis Brian Otis
  • Firat Yazicioglu Firat Yazicioglu
  • Reza Zadno Reza Zadno

Yet another mostly male meeting (YAMMM) from Cold Spring Harbor

I guess this would go down in “You Can’t Make This Stuff Up” or something like that. A few weeks ago, I posted an anonymous guest post about the lack of female speakers at the Programming for Biology workshop at Cold Spring Harbor Labs: Guest post on Yet Another Mostly Male Meeting (YAMMM) – Programming for Biology.  This got a response from Cold Spring Harbor on Twitter claiming they do work to have diverse speakers at their meetings.

Then I got an email last week inviting me to Cold Spring Harbor meeting on the History of DNA Sequencing with a truly awful gender ratio.  So I wrote a blog post about that: Cold Spring Harbor presents the men’s only view on the evolution of sequencing.  And also started a discussion about this on Twitter.

//platform.twitter.com/widgets.js
And in response to some comments from some of the CSHL Meeting people I decided to look into the past meetings in the same history of science series and was saddened with the incredibly low # of female speakers at all the meetings in this series. So I posted about that …

//platform.twitter.com/widgets.js
And had more discussions on Twitter where CSHL made some claims about these History of Science meetings being a special case (not buying their argument, just reporting what they said).

And I thought I could have a relaxing Fourth of July weekend not spending my time dealing with Cold Spring Harbor Meetings.  And then, well, I got an email from CSHL that I just looked at a few minutes ago.  This email invited me to one of their “CSHL Asia Conferences”.

I clicked on the link and when to the meeting site: Biological Rhythms and sadly I got sucked into YAMMM (yet another mostly male meeting) land.  Here are the details on the organizers and presenters as far as I could sort out.  I have labelled people I infer to be likely male in yellow and likely female in green.  (I note I accept that a binary male vs. female representation of gender is less than ideal but I think in general this is a useful thing to look and to make some hypotheses for to assess meetings).

Organizers:

  1. Carla Green, UT Southwestern, USA
  2. Michael Hastings, MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology, UK
  3. Joseph Takahashi, HHMI/UT Southwestern, USA
  4. Hiroki Ueda, University of Tokyo/RIKEN, Japan
  5. Han Wang, Soochow University, China

Speakers

  1. Joseph Takahashi, HHMI/UT Southwestern Medical Center, USA 
  2. Ravi Allada, Northwestern University, USA 
  3. Joseph Bass, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, USA 
  4. Deborah Bell-Pedersen, Texas A&M University, USA 
  5. Nicolas Cermakian, Douglas Mental Health University Institute, CANADA 
  6. Xinnian Dong, Duke University, USA 
  7. Yoshitaka Fukada, University of Tokyo, JAPAN 
  8. Carla Green, The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, USA 
  9. Jinhu Guo, Sun Yat-Sen University, China 
  10. Fang Han, Peking University People’s Hospital of Beijing, CHINA 
  11. Qun He, China Agricultural University, China 
  12. John Hogenesch, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, USA 
  13. Zhili Huang, Fudan University, China 
  14. Takao Kondo, Nagoya University/Div. of Biological Science, JAPAN 
  15. Katja Lamia, The Scripps Research Institute, USA 
  16. Cheng Chi Lee, University of Texas Health Science Center Houston, USA 
  17. Yi Liu, UT Southwestern Medical Center, USA 
  18. Chang Liu, Nanjing Normal University, China 
  19. Hugh Piggins, University of Manchester, UNITED KINGDOM 
  20. Till Roenneberg, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Munich, GERMANY 
  21. Louis Ptacek, HHMI/University of California San Francisco, USA 
  22. Hiroki Ueda, RIKEN Kobe Institute, JAPAN 
  23. David Virshup, Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School, SINGAPORE 
  24. Han Wang, Soochow University, China 
  25. Charles Weitz, Harvard Medical School, USA 
  26. David Whitmore, University College London, UNITED KINGDOM 
  27. Ying Xu, Soochow University, China 
  28. Xiaodong Xu, Hubei Normal University, China 
  29. Erquan Zhang, National Institute of Biological Sciences, China 
  30. Zhangwu Zhao, China Agricultural University, China
So that is 30 speakers.  Only 29 of which could I find information on the web to make a hypothesis of gender.  Of those 29, I inferred 6 – or 20% to be female.  That is just really low for biological sciences.  I am sorry Cold Spring Harbor but you are just not doing a good enough job with diversity.  Scratch that, you are doing a bad job.  Sad to see.  

Gender and tenure diversity and Github teams (from #UCDavis)

Thanks to the UC Davis College of Engineering Twitter Feed for pointing me to this

//platform.twitter.com/widgets.js
The paper behind this is available as a preprint here.

Abstract:

Software development is usually a collaborative venture. Open Source Software (OSS) projects are no exception; in- deed, by design, the OSS approach can accommodate teams that are more open, geographically distributed, and dynamic than commercial teams. This, we find, leads to OSS teams that are quite diverse. Team diversity, predominantly in of- fline groups, is known to correlate with team output, mostly with positive effects. How about in OSS? 

Using GITHUB, the largest publicly available collection of OSS projects, we studied how gender and tenure diversity relate to team productivity and turnover. Using regression modeling of GITHUB data and the results of a survey, we show that both gender and tenure diversity are positive and significant predictors of productivity, together explaining a sizable fraction of the data variability. These results can inform decision making on all levels, leading to better out- comes in recruiting and performance.

Really, really fascinating.

Not protesting this commencement address: Nancy Hopkins at BU on Gender Bias in STEM

Thank you Paula Olsiewski for pointing me to this: Boston University’s 141st Commencement Baccalaureate Address: Nancy Hopkins.  It is the text of the commencement address that Nancy Hopkins gave at BU on Monday.  And it is really worth reading.  Or watching.

And fortunately BU has posted video of the talk

In the talk Hopkins discusses her work in biology and the subtle and overt gender bias she has seen. Hopkins is quite an amazing person. For more about her see

Also see a talk by Hopkins at U. Chicago from 2011 at a colloqiuium on advancing women in science and engineering. 

Perhaps this meeting should be renamed "Of Microbiomes and Men" ….

Well, just got an email inviting me to participate in a meeting on microbiomes. The full invite is at the bottom of this posting.  Alas, at first glances it seems this meeting, has, well, some gender issues.

Confirmed Keynote Speakers: both male.

  • Mark Adams, Ph.D., Scientific Director, J. Craig Venter Institute, San Diego
  • Sarkis K. Mazmanian, Professor of Biology, California Institute of Technology

Confirmed other speakers: all seven male

  • Pierre Belichard, Co-founder and CEO, Enterome
  • Adam Godzik, Ph.D., Bioinformatics and Systems Biology, Professor & Program Director, Sanford-Burnham Research Institute
  • JunHua Li, Team Leader of Reference Metagenomics, BGI Research
  • Victor Nizet, MD, Professor & Division Chief, Department of Pediatrics, UCSD School of Medicine, San Diego
  • Steve Orndorff, NuMe Health
  • Andrei Osterman, Ph.D., Professor, Bioinformatics & Systems Biology, Infectious and Inflammatory Disease Center, Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute
  • Bernd Schnabl, MD, Assistant Professor, Division of Gastroenterology, UCSD School of Medicine, TSRI California Campus

I suppose one could say “Well, they are still working on their agenda … maybe they will have some female speakers.”  So I decided to dig around a little bit more. They provide a link to the outline agenda here. Alas that is even worse.  There we find out who some invited speakers are who have not yet accepted

  • David Odelson, R&D Program Director, Life Technologies
  • Peter B. DiLaura, President & CEO, Second Genome
  • Chris Christofferson, Morganthaler Ventures 
  • Lou Tartaglia, Third Rock Ventures
  • Mike Grey, Pappas Ventures
  • Justin L. Sonnenburg, Assistant Professor, Microbiology & Immunology, Stanford School of Medicine, Palo Alto, CA

So that is 9 confirmed speakers and six invited speakers – all of whom are male.  Great.  Here is a suggestion.  DO NOT GO TO THIS MEETING.

Microbiome Masthead
The Microbiome / Microbiota R&D and Business Collaboration Forum
Special August Registration Discount SAVE 15%

use discount code NN/AUG15/AL
Keynote speakers:
Mark Adams, Ph.D., Scientific Director, J. Craig Venter Institute, San Diego
Sarkis K. Mazmanian, Professor of Biology, California Institute of Technology
Dear Jonathan

The announcement in June that Johnson & Johnson is collaborating with Second Genome, one of the first biotech companies focused entirely on the human microbiome, is, according to Forbes magazine, a turning point at which “big Pharma” money begins to back this new field of research.

The 1-2 kilograms of bacteria living inside, and on the surface of, all human beings – the Human Microbiome – constitutes both another “human” organ and a third protective “immune system” after the innate and adaptive immune systems. This mix of good and bad bacteria, long a subject of academic interest, has been linked to everything from infectious diseases like clostridium difficile to obesity and even mental health. Now that the commercial potential of this field of research is being recognized it is attracting venture capital and other funding.

The developments in research and the commercial possibilities are the subject of The Microbiome/Microbiota R&D and Business Collaboration Forum, which will take place in San Diego onOctober 7th & 8th 2013.

Register today to secure the August 15% booking discount:
www.globalengage.co.uk/microbiome.html

Any questions? email nnoakes@globalengage.co.uk or telephone +44 (0)1865 849841

Confirmed Keynote Speakers


Mark Adams
Mark Adams, Ph.D., Scientific Director, J. Craig Venter Institute, San Diego

Sarkis Mazmanian
Sarkis K. Mazmanian, Professor of Biology, California Institute of Technology

Confirmed Speakers


Pierre Belichard, Co-founder and CEO, Enterome
Adam Godzik, Ph.D., Bioinformatics and Systems Biology, Professor & Program Director, Sanford-Burnham Research Institute
JunHua Li, Team Leader of Reference Metagenomics, BGI Research
Victor Nizet, MD, Professor & Division Chief, Department of Pediatrics, UCSD School of Medicine, San Diego
Steve Orndorff, NuMe Health
Andrei Osterman, Ph.D., Professor, Bioinformatics & Systems Biology, Infectious and Inflammatory Disease Center, Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute
Bernd Schnabl, MD, Assistant Professor, Division of Gastroenterology, UCSD School of Medicine, TSRI California Campus

This first-in-class, microbiome-focused hybrid R&D and business conference attracting 150 attendees from all over the world, plus an exceptional speaker faculty, will provide an interactive networking forum to both further research and commercialization opportunities.  It also aims to answer your queries through a vibrant exhibition room full of technology providers showcasing their R&D platforms & services; as well as via scientific poster sessions; expert-led case-study presentations; and interactive Q&A panel discussions.
The Outline Agenda


Sequencing/Bioinformatics of the Microbiome

  • An overview of the human microbiome project
  • Contributions to Metagenomics and Data Analysis
  • Advances in sequencing technologies
  • The role of chip technologies (the Phylo chip) as a rapid readout vs. sequencing
  • The $1000 genome may cost $100Ms to interpret!

Venture Capital + Technology Transfer

  • Commercializing Microbiome Technologies from Government & Academic Entities
  • International Small Company Showcase

The microbiome of the GI tract

  • The role of commensal bacteria in regulating the immune system
  • Metabolic exchange in gut microbial communities: who needs vitamins?
  • Contemplating novel antibiotic therapies that do not destroy the healthy microbiome
  • Metagenomic profiling in IBD

Clinical Applications

  • The contribution of the gut microbiome to liver disease
  • Treatment of C. Difficile infections with fecal transplants

Connections to the Food World

  • The role of diet in regulating the microbiome mix
  • Prebiotics vs. probiotics vs. pharmaceuticals
  • Opportunities to treat diabetes and obesity via the microbiome
  • Panel Discussion – Pharma/Biotech/Food Industry Partnering
  • Small Company Showcases
www.globalengage.co.uk/microbiome.html
Not interested in the Microbiome/Microbiota?
Unsubscribe here

Nick Noakesnnoakes@globalengage.co.uk Tel +44 (0) 1865 849841
Global Engage, The Kidlington Centre, Kidlington, Oxfordshire, OX5 2DL, UK.

You might think that at some point some of the people organizing meetings

Another genomics meeting featuring men men men and men: International Forum on "Genomics, Innovation and economic growth"

Well this is just peachy.  Saw this tweet

And my first thought was – please – please – please let this meeting have a decent gender ratio. I am so so sick of genome meetings that have gender ratio issues. Alas, then I went to their site: International Forum “Genomics, Innovation and economic growth”

11 plenary speakers. All of them men.  See here.
Forum president: 1 man
Advisory Board: 5 men

Crap crap crap. What is WRONG WITH PEOPLE?

Nothing else to say really.  But I will not be going I guess I can say that.

Important read for those interested in gender, family & academia: Do Babies Matter

Just got pointed to this by Julie Huber on Facebook: New book on gender, family and academe shows how kids affect careers in higher education | Inside Higher Ed.  The book is “Do Babies Matter? Gender and Family in the Ivory Tower.”  This looks like a very important book and is especially relevant to me in my role in the UC Davis ADVANCE project where we are working on related issues.  It is from Mary Ann Mason at Berkeley Law School, Nicholas Wolfinger from Utah, and Marc Goulden from the UC Berkeley Office for Faculty Equity and Welfare.  It is definitely worth checking out.

I am ordering it right now …

//ws-na.amazon-adsystem.com/widgets/q?ServiceVersion=20070822&OneJS=1&Operation=GetAdHtml&MarketPlace=US&source=ac&ref=tf_til&ad_type=product_link&tracking_id=thtrofli-20&marketplace=amazon&region=US&placement=0813560802&asins=0813560802&linkId=75TIN64EXB6DWWOT&show_border=true&link_opens_in_new_window=true

Re-reading this on "Why women leave academia and why universities should be worried"

Been reading some somewhat old material out there on women in academia.  I am getting more and more interested in this issue especially as I have become more involved in the UC Davis ADVANCE Program.  The ADVANCE program from the National Science Foundation “aims to increase the participation and advancement of women in academic science and engineering careers.”

I was pointed to this Guardian article from 2012 today based on “The chemistry PhD: the impact on women’s retention”: Why women leave academia and why universities should be worried | Higher Education Network | Guardian Professional.   This Guardian article has a lot of detail and links to other information.  Definitely worth checking out if you had not seen it or forgotten it.

Q-Bio conference in Hawaii, bring your surfboard & your Y chromosome b/c they don’t take a XX

Wow.  Just wow.  And not in a good way.  Just got an email invitation to a meeting.  The meeting is

THE FIRST ANNUAL WINTER Q-BIO MEETING: Quantitative Biology on the Hawaiian Islands. February 18-21, 2013.”  

Well, I mean – who wouldn’t want to go to Hawaii for a meeting.  And a meeting that 

“brings together scientists and engineers who are interested in all areas of q-bio.”  

Plus 

“Each year, the meeting will rotate on the Hawaiian Islands with a different thematic focus within q-bio.”

So I could go to Hawaii each year.  Cool.  And 

“The focus for the meeting this year will be Synthetic Biology, with about half of the invited speakers chosen as renowned experts in this area.”  

I like synthetic biology and, well, sometimes I like experts, so still good

But then, OMG, then, the confirmed speaker list and the conference organizers.

2013 CONFIRMED SPEAKERS:

  1. Jim Collins, Boston University
  2. Johan Elf, Uppsala University
  3. Michael Elowitz, California Institute of Technology
  4. Timothy Elston, UNC Chapel Hill School of Medicine
  5. James E. Ferrell, Stanford University 
  6. Martin Fussenegger, ETH Zurich
  7. Leon Glass, McGill University
  8. Terry Hwa, University of California, San Diego
  9. Roy Kishony, Harvard Medical School
  10. Galit Lahav, Harvard University
  11. Andre Levchenko, Johns Hopkins University
  12. Wendell Lim, University of California, San Francisco
  13. Andy Oates, The Max Planck Institute, Dresden
  14. Bernhard Palsson, University of California, San Diego
  15. Gurol Suel, UT Southwestern Medical Center
  16. Chao Tang, Peking University
  17. John Tyson, Virginia Tech
  18. Craig Venter, The J. Craig Venter Institute
  19. Chris Voigt, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
  20. Ned S. Wingreen, Princeton University  

CONFERENCE ORGANIZERS:

  1. Bill Ditto, University of Hawaii 
  2. Jeff Hasty, UC San Diego 
  3. Bill Hlavacek, University of New Mexico
  4. Alex Hoffmann, UC San Diego
  5. Brian Munsky, New Mexico Consortium 
  6. Lev Tsimring, UC San Diego 
That is a 25:1 ratio.  Pathetic.  Embarrassing.  The sponsors – UC San Diego’s Division of Biological Sciences and BioCircuits Institute, San Diego Center for Systems Biology, the University of Hawaii and the Office of Naval Research – should all be ashamed.




For other posts on this topic see




UPDATE – I have now submitted an abstract to the meeting.  The abstract I submitted is available here and posted below

The probability of having one out of twenty six participants at a scientific meeting be female

A quantitative analysis of gender bias in quantitative biology meetings 
Jonathan A. Eisen
University of California, Davis
(Note – new title suggested by John Hogenesch)
Scientific conferences have key participants which I define to be the speakers and the organizers. Such key participants can be divided into two main classes based on gender: male and female, which I denote here as M and F, respectively (I realize there are other gender classes and I regretfully am not including them here). The number of key participants (which I denote as KP) for conferences varies significantly. For this analysis I focused on meetings with KP = 26. This value was selected for multiple reasons, including (a) that it is the number of letters in the English alphabet (b) that its factors include the number 13 which I like, and (3) because in email announcements for this meeting KP= 26. I sought to answer a relatively simple question – what is the probability that, for a meeting with KP=26, that F = 1. I chose this because this seemed extreme and because F=1 in the email announcements for this meeting. Using the probability mass distribution formula as below:
which becomes

n = NP = number of participants
k = f = the number that are female
p = percentage of f in population being sampled

I have calculated Pr (F=1) for KP = 26. Assuming for the moment that p = 0.5 (i.e., that the population to be sampled is 50:50 male vs female) then Pr (F=1) = 3.8743E-07. This is highly unlikely by chance alone. However the assumption of p = 0.5 is certainly off in some fields. I therefore calculated P (F=1) for different frequencies of F in the population (i.e., what is the expected ratio of females to sample from).

Thus for a meeting with NP = 26, only when the frequency of F is ~0.16 does P (F=1) exceed 0.05. So a question is then, what should we use for p for this meeting? An informal survey (John Hogenesch, posted to Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/jonathaneisen/posts/10151208978630767?comment_id=24634832&offset=0&total_comments=15 ) suggests that in qBio the percentage is about 20%. However that may not be an ideal estimate since this meeting is specifically about synthetic biology, I do not have a any estimate of p for this field. However, examination of key meetings in the field (e.g., see http://syntheticbiology.org/Conferences.html for a list) reveals a percentage of perhaps a bit higher. For example at SB5 the ratio was about 35%. I conclude that it is likely that p > 20% in Synthetic Biology. Given that for p = 0.2 the Pr (F=1) < 0.05 I therefore conclude that the null hypothesis (that having one female out of 26 key participants) can be rejected – and that this meeting has a biased ratio of males: females.



UPDATE 2: Here is the full email I received, just for the record

ABSTRACT SUBMISSION DEADLINE 09/15/12http://w-qbio.org/abstracts.html

THE FIRST ANNUAL WINTER Q-BIO MEETING
Quantitative Biology on the Hawaiian Islands
February 18-21, 2013http://w-qbio.org/

The Winter q-bio meeting brings together scientists and engineers who are interested in all areas of q-bio. Each year, the meeting will rotate on the Hawaiian Islands with a different thematic focus within q-bio. The focus for the meeting this year will be Synthetic Biology, with about half of the invited speakers chosen as renowned experts in this area.

SPONSORED BY:UC San Diego’s Division of Biological Sciences and BioCircuits Institute
San Diego Center for Systems Biology
University of Hawaii
Office of Naval Research

2013 CONFIRMED SPEAKERS:
Jim Collins, Boston University
Johan Elf, Uppsala University
Michael Elowitz, California Institute of Technology
Timothy Elston, UNC Chapel Hill School of Medicine
James E. Ferrell, Stanford University
Martin Fussenegger, ETH Zurich
Leon Glass, McGill University
Terry Hwa, University of California, San Diego
Roy Kishony, Harvard Medical School
Galit Lahav, Harvard University
Andre Levchenko, Johns Hopkins University
Wendell Lim, University of California, San Francisco
Andy Oates, The Max Planck Institute, Dresden
Bernhard Palsson, University of California, San Diego
Gurol Suel, UT Southwestern Medical Center
Chao Tang, Peking University
John Tyson, Virginia Tech
Craig Venter, The J. Craig Venter Institute
Chris Voigt, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Ned S. Wingreen, Princeton University

CONFERENCE ORGANIZERS:
Bill Ditto, University of Hawaii
Jeff Hasty, UC San Diego
Bill Hlavacek, University of New Mexico
Alex Hoffmann, UC San Diego
Brian Munsky, New Mexico Consortium
Lev Tsimring, UC San Diego

***REGISTRATION NOW OPEN***
Registration fee covers conference venue, opening reception, banquet, coffee & snacks.

EARLY BIRD ($450.00) REGISTRATION DEADLINE: December 1, 2012
REGULAR REGISTRATION ($550) DEADLINE: February 5, 2013

REGISTER NOW: http://w-qbio.org/abstracts.html

HOTEL: A block of rooms have been reserved for registered conference participants available for a negotiated rate of $199 per night at the Hilton Hawaiian Village in Waikiki. The rooms are available on first come first serve basis and will be available soon, so book early!

CONTRIBUTED TALKS: If you wish to present your work at the conference, either as an oral talk or a poster, you must submit an abstract through the conference website by the September 15th deadline. Abstract guidelines and submission information at:http://w-qbio.org/guidelines.pdf

ABSTRACT DEADLINE: September 15, 2012
Accepted abstracts will be announced October 31, 2012.

We encourage you to forward this message to any colleagues that may be interested in taking part in this exciting event.

Questions should be emailed to: coordinator@w-qbio.org




UPDATE 4:  (9/18/12)

Plus some links that may be of relevance


UPDATE 6: 9/23/12

Some more links on the recent PNAS paper on gender bias and evaluating scientists


UPDATE 7:  9/23/12

Interesting article on gender and invitations to write major reviews

UPDATE 8: More follow up to the Gender Bias study from PNAS 9/26

UPDATE 9: Other posts on gender bias of interest


UPDATE 10: 11/21/13

Just got this in my email.  Kudos to the people behind qBio for adding more women to their planning committee and adding a many women to the speaker list.
***ABSTRACT SUBMISSION DEADLINE EXTENDED TO MONDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2013***
http://w-qbio.org/abstracts/

UPDATE:  In response to participant interest, the submission deadline has been extended to December 2, 2013.  This year 15 contributed talks will be selected from the submitted abstracts to be presented with the invited talks during the plenary sessions.  Contributed talks will also be selected for parallel breakout sessions which commence in the late afternoon.

THE SECOND ANNUAL WINTER Q-BIO MEETING
Quantitative Biology on the Hawaiian Islands
February 17-20, 2014
http://w-qbio.org/

The Winter q-bio meeting brings together scientists and engineers who are interested in all areas of q-bio. The venue for 2014 is the Hilton Waikoloa Village, which is located on the Kohala Coast of Hawaii’s Big Island. The resort lets you experience breathtaking tropical gardens, abundant wildlife, award-winning dining, world-class shopping, art and culture, and an array of activities. The Island of Hawaii is the youngest and biggest in the Hawaiian chain, providing a vast canvas of environments to discover–home of one of the world’s most active volcanoes (Kilauea), the most massive mountain in the world (Maunaloa), and the largest park in the state (Hawaii Volcanoes National Park).

SPONSORED BY:
UC San Diego BioCircuits Institute and the San Diego Center for Systems Biology
The University of Hawaii at Manoa
UC San Diego Divisions of Biological Sciences and Engineering
The Office of Naval Research

2014 CONFIRMED SPEAKERS:
Naama Barkai, The Weizmann Institute of Science
Sangeeta Bhatia Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Hana El-Samad, University of California, San Francisco
Zev Gartner, University of California, San Francisco
Taekjip Ha, University of Illinois
Shigeru Kondo, Osaka University
Arthur Lander, University of California, Irvine
Andrew Murray, Harvard University
Steve Quake, Stanford University
Petra Schwille, Max Planck Institute
Christina Smolke, Stanford University
Aleksandra Walczak, Laboratoire de Physique Théorique

CONFERENCE ORGANIZERS:
Kevin Bennett, University of Hawaii at Manoa
William Ditto, University of Hawaii at Manoa
Hana El-Samad, University of California, San Francisco
Jeff Hasty, University of California, San Diego
Alexander Hoffmann, University of California, San Diego
Galit Lahav, Harvard University
Eva-Maria Schoetz-Collins, University of California, San Diego
Chao Tang, Peking University
Lev Tsimring, University of California, San Diego

***REGISTRATION NOW OPEN***
Registration fee covers conference venue, registration reception, banquet, coffee & snacks.

EARLY BIRD REGISTRATION ($500/$425 Student) DEADLINE: December 20, 2013
REGULAR REGISTRATION ($600/$525 Student) DEADLINE: January 31, 2014
LATE REGISTRATION ($675/$600 Student) After January 31, 2014

REGISTER NOW: http://w-qbio.org/

HOTEL:  A block of rooms has been reserved for registered conference participants at a negotiated rate of $199 per night at the Hilton Waikoloa Village. The rooms will be available soon on a first-come, first-served basis, so book early!

CONTRIBUTED TALKS:  If you wish to present your work at the conference, either as an oral talk or a poster, you must submit an abstract through the conference website by the November 5th deadline. Abstract guidelines and submission information at: http://w-qbio.org/abstracts/

ABSTRACT DEADLINE: EXTENDED UNTIL MONDAY, December 2, 2013 (Extended due to large volume of interest!)
Accepted abstracts will be announced by December 6, 2012.  You may submit your abstract now and if accepted, still register by the early bird registration deadline of December 20, 2013.
Abstract guidelines and submission information at: http://w-qbio.org/abstracts/

We encourage you to forward this message to any colleagues that may be interested in taking part in this exciting event.

Questions should be emailed to: coordinator@w-qbio.org